Search Results for low wage work

MINIMUM WAGE IMPACTS

DOCUMENTED IMPACTS OF MINIMUM WAGE INCREASES ON JOB GROWTH, BUSINESS HEALTH, CONSUMER PRICES, AND FAMILY SPENDING An overview of the U.S. experience, with new findings from San Diego County June 2016 Peter Brownell, PhD   DOWNLOAD REPORT HERE Introduction and Summary As the cost of living varies from place to place and increases over time, many states and cities have set minimum wages above the federal level and raised them repeatedly. In just the 15 years from 2000 through 2014, the federal minimum wage rose three times and 30 states raised their own wage floors an average of five times
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SHORTED: WAGE THEFT, TIME THEFT, AND DISCRIMINATION IN SAN DIEGO’S RESTAURANT INDUSTRY

Wage theft is a national problem, especially in low-wage industries. In cities and states previously studied, the restaurant industry has consistently been found to be one of the most abusive. In San Diego County, 125,700 people – nearly one-tenth of all workers – are employed in restaurants, and the industry is growing at almost double the rate of overall employment in the county. This survey of 337 employees of restaurants throughout San Diego County uncovered disturbing numbers of legal violations and other  exploitative workplace practices among restaurants of all kinds – from fast food to fine dining. This is a
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WORKING ON THE MARGINS

January 2001 The United States is experiencing unprecedented economic prosperity. Unemployment rates are at historic lows, inflation appears to be curbed and new millionaires are being created almost daily. However, this prosperity has not guaranteed job security for all workers. In fact, we are seeing a dramatic rise in “non-secure” employment, or nonstandard work arrangements that do not provide the stability and benefits of regular, full-time work. The highest growth was found in the number of workers hired through a Temporary Help Agency. This report analyzes state and county data for agency workers in California, focusing on 15 of the
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POVERTY REPORT 2015

Five years after the national recession ended, the San Diego poverty rate remains stubbornly high, while the number of San Diegans living in official poverty has continued to grow. The problem is particularly dire for children and part-time workers in the city. Among large local industries, hotels and restaurants continue to pay the lowest wages. The findings in this report are from the U.S. Census Bureau 2014 American Community Survey, which was released Sept. 17, 2015.  KEY FINDINGS Persistent Poverty:  San Diego’s poverty rate remained at 15.7% of the population in 2014, effectively unchanged from the previous year’s 15.8%, despite significant
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DRIVEN TO DESPAIR

May 2013, San Diego State University and the Center on Policy Initiatives This report presents results of a survey of San Diego taxi drivers conducted in March and April of 2013. We surveyed 331 taxi drivers, asking about earnings, expenses, hours, health care, vehicle safety and industry practices. The findings reveal problems with the taxi regulatory system and working conditions that have serious impacts on public health and safety, as well as the lives of the drivers and their families. KEY FINDINGS: 1) Almost 90% of licensed taxi drivers in San Diego are “lease drivers,” who rent the cars from individual or
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MAKING ENDS MEET 2010

Almost a third of working-age households in San Diego County have incomes below what they need to meet basic living expenses. Half of those struggling households include someone with a full-time job. Making Ends Meet in San Diego County 2010, a study released today by the Center on Policy Initiatives and United Way of San Diego County, measured local costs of housing, child care, food and other basic expenses to determine a bare-bones budget for various-sized families. Findings include: 229,195 non-retired households in the county — 3 in 10 — earn less than that “self-sufficiency” level, including more than 180,000
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